Most Pressing Issues In Early Church Studies – A Top 10 List

Here is a partial list that I will update and edit as needed.  In general, this will serve as a guide to future posts as the site develops. 

My hope is that my readers may help me fill in the blanks and/or rearrange the list a bit, so let me know what you think!

10.

9.  Gender issues in ministry.

8.

7.  Application of the kingdom of God to governmental rule.

6.

5.  The role of tradition and non-canonical writings in the early church. 

4. 

3.  The distinction/development of offices and gifting in ministry.

2.

1.  The definition and/or perception of the term “church.”

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2 thoughts on “Most Pressing Issues In Early Church Studies – A Top 10 List

  1. Bill says:

    History and chronology.

    Why has Acts 1-7 always been ascribed such a large portion of years? Why do scholars who date Paul’s conversion to 33/34 so often support 30 for the cross, but scholars who take 33 for the cross tend to resist moving Paul’s conversion so early? So that Acts 2 has more weight as a model for “the early church”.

    Why do Christian scholars resist dating 1st Timothy in Acts 19? Why do ecclesiastical authorities prefer to reconstruct purely hypothetical travels for Paul after Rome? So that the so-called “Pastorals” can appear to be the “next step” in God’s plan for the church’s evolution?

    Those are just two of the biggies…

    Thrilled to find your blog, by the way.

    • John says:

      Ahh yes, history…

      One of my favorite quotes comes from the opening lines of Braveheart…”history is written by those who have hanged heroes.”

      I guess, that is partly why I started this blog, so your suggested issues of history and chronology are indeed good ones. I’ll make sure to address such things as we go.

      In short, I agree that these issues can be sculpted to strengthen one’s own presupposed argument or agenda.

      Nice addition to the list!

      Thanks!

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