On Pastoral Ministry And Financial Stability – Part 1 of 2

I just stumbled across a well written article on Pastoral Ministry (via Dave Black’s site) and the question of salary or pay for this work.

Why reinvent the wheel when someone else has already done so!

The full article is here.

I particularly liked the following concluding thought:

“If our churches truly implemented New Testament patterns of ministry, one wonders whether there would be any real need to support one, full-time pastor? If the local church had a functioning priesthood (as opposed to the passive, spectator event that is the mark of most churches) and an equally shared eldership, there simply would not be the urgency or necessity to hire someone on a full-time basis. This is because (1) leadership responsibilities would be shared; (2) one man and his gifts would not become the focal-point of the meeting; (3) corporate teaching would be shared and not left to one sole pastor; and (4) each member would actively participate and contribute to the meeting.” (Darryl Erkel)

Consider what would happen to the church if such a model once again became the norm?  I can think of ten things right off the top of my head that would make the church stronger, yet I cannot think of one single thing that would make it weaker.

So, the question as I see it is this:

What was the reason for the change?

Fundamentally, the answer is found throughout the Bible as we read story after story.  This is nothing new to God.  He has seen this over and over for years, centuries, millenia!

The answer centers around one central idea – God is not enough.

Ponder that, and I’ll post more on this topic later…

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3 thoughts on “On Pastoral Ministry And Financial Stability – Part 1 of 2

  1. alam says:

    I think of the churches I know – their income – and their expenditure on ‘staff salaries’ and then their giving/support to missions. I tell you – it’s sinful! There’s no other word for it. Toatlly disproportionate. I have known also churches which have gone through an ‘interegnum’ and they’ve blossomed and grown as everyone has contributed – only to lapse back into spectatorship once the professional has been wheeled in….it tells it’s own story.

  2. John says:

    It is interesting that so much that is important to pay for today was not an issue in the early churches.

  3. A. Amos Love says:

    Amen – Why isn’t jesus enough?

    There are those who want to be “King.” (pastor)
    And those who want a “King” (Pastor) to be like the other people.
    1 Sam 8:1-22.

    The people became “servants” of the “King” (pastor)
    and they become “spectators” when they could be “participating.”

    They wind up being “Spiritually Abused,” deprived of ever knowing
    there is a living Christ within them who can feed them.
    They try to exist on the left overs of others.

    BUT, those “pastor/leaders” pay a horrible price in the long run.

    http://pastoralcareinc.com/WhyPastoralCare/Statistics.php

    # 95% of pastors do not regularly pray with their spouses.
    # 90% feel they are inadequately trained to cope with the ministry demands.
    # 80% of pastors feel unqualified and discouraged as pastors.
    # 80% believe pastoral ministry has negatively affected their families.
    …………..Many pastor’s children do not attend church now
    ……………because of what the church has done to their parents.
    # 70% of pastors constantly fight depression.
    # 70% say they have a lower self-image now than when they first started.
    # 50% feel unable to meet the demands of the job.
    # 50% of the ministers starting out will not last 5 years.
    # 33% state that being in the ministry is an outright hazard to their family.

    Have mercy Lord…

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